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Stay at Home Solutions blogs on topics such as aging in place, universal design, adaptive equipment, home modifications, accessibility, durable medical equipment, legislation, and caregiving.

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New Year Resolution 2019 for Your Home
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Unsplash

Happy New Year, my friends! Here at Stay at Home Solutions, we really enjoyed celebrating the holidays, but we’re even happier to get back on track with our purpose to serve the Kansas City area and beyond.

Our mission is to help people figure out what changes they need to live at home safely and independently as long as they choose.

What do I mean by making changes in the home? They could be as simple as putting an automatic sensor night light next to the bed or placing the most used dishes closer to your reach. Some changes in the home may be more extensive like installing a barrier free shower or making one entryway stepless.

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Unsplash

Believe it or not, many people don’t have the choice of living in their own home.

Falls and injuries in the home are often the culprit to why someone needs to move out of their private abode.

Unfortunately, I’ve seen a lot of well meaning friends and family members make the unwanted decision to move their loved one into a senior living community or a nursing home. It’s hard for every party involved in this situation. No one wants to have their loved one move into an institution.

Let me help you prevent this scenario in your life! There are many preventable actions you can take today to avoid having someone else decide when you move out of your house. Make it your resolve to call us to help you navigate what actions to take!

I’ll tell you what actions Esther took to help her live in her home safely. When I saw Esther, she explained that she barely took showers because she was scared to death of falling while getting in and out of her shower.

I didn’t blame Esther at all. Looking at the shower I wondered how she managed to get in at all! The shower required her to step up eight inches and had a small, slippery built in seat.

Now, I know that doesn’t seem like a big deal to you if you’ve never had problems moving around. But it’s a BIG deal to a lot of older adults.

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Unsplash

During my evaluation, I noticed Esther was weak and needed quite a bit of help from her caregiver to get in and out of the shower. The chronic pain in her back and legs made it more difficult to shower without falling at a moment’s notice.

Esther lives in a senior living community. The director of the community explained that the shower Esther had was newly installed. It was their version of a “walk in shower”. Naturally if Esther wanted a new shower, she could pay for it out of pocket.

Sidenote: Why don’t these communities consult with occupational therapists? We can help them save so much time and money by not installing these step up showers!

Not to my surprise, Esther was not interested in installing a barrier free shower with money from her own pocket. “What am I going to do? Not shower at all?”

During my assessment, I measured the dimensions of the shower and noted that a shower chair with a backrest and armrests could easily fit inside. The shower chair would provide firm seating for Esther instead of the slippery built in seat. I recommended she install a couple of grab bars: one outside the shower and one inside next to the shower chair.

Sadly, the bathroom did not allow enough space for us to make changes to the step up inside the shower. Esther said she would just deal with it, “Maybe it will strengthen my legs.”

Esther already had a long handled shower head to aim water wherever she needed while sitting down. Sitting down while showering saves energy and prevents falls. It also gives caregivers peace of mind to not worry about catching a slippery body!

When the contractor came to install the grab bars, I worked with him on the best placement based off of Esther’s height and reach.

I love customizing changes at home to the client’s exact needs!

Once the project was completed and everything was installed, Esther took her first shower. She gushed about it over the phone to me, “I love it so much! I feel much safer!”

On my next visit to Esther’s home, she was late to answer the door. I felt concerned at first thinking Esther had an accident and was injured. Much to my relief, Esther came to the door and told me, “I felt so good taking a shower this morning that I asked my caregiver to let me sit in there longer.”

I can’t describe how amazing it feels to help someone feel safer doing what so many of us take for granted. Every day, we bebop along getting dressed in the morning, making coffee, driving to work, vacuuming, etc. We don’t think about what it might look like when we get older or if we were to have an injury.

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Unsplash

Now, Esther takes more showers during the week because she feels safe and comfortable. Her caregiver doesn’t worry about her falling as much while getting in and out of the shower. My work helped two people and gave peace of mind to Esther’s sons.

This anecdote is just a small slice of what I do for people in my community. It’s amazing to tell people what I do for a living: I empower people to live in their home safely. This is my purpose on this planet.

I’m challenging you to make a resolution at the top of 2019 right now. Your resolution is to take one action step towards helping you live at home for a lifetime. That action step could be many things: call me, look at my blog for ideas, watch my videos, or learn about financial resources for home modifications by clicking HERE.

Just learning about your options for making changes at home can be tremendously helpful in the future when you need it. Why wait? Do it before you need it!

Tis the Season for Granny's Holiday Gift Guide!
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Happy holidays, fellow adult children or adult grandchildren of the world! I created a lovely holiday gift guide for your consideration when purchasing a gift for dear Granny or Grandpa.

Naysayer: “You’re too late! Why didn’t you post this gift guide before Black Friday?”

Well, naysayer, I understand your frustrated cries, but I do know that there are procrastinators out there like me. If you’re taking care of yourself, your kids, and your parents, how do you even have time to plan Black Friday shopping? Haven’t you heard about how hard caregivers have it in life?

Or maybe you just need extra time to digest your holiday shopping options before making a money-based commitment. Either way, I’m trying to make it easier for you to get what your mature relatives need and want!

After much conversation with several grannies in my life, I compiled a list for your consideration this holiday season. Let the gift giving begin!

1) Roomba

Amazon

Amazon

The Roomba almost did not make the list this year because it’s a little controversial for people who have a hard time walking in the house.

You see, Roombas can be a little too quiet and difficult to see for grannies and grandpas. They could become a potential trip hazard! We don’t want to give the holiday experience of going to the ER!

The reasons why we decided to place Roombas on the holiday gift guide outnumber the risk for falls. As we get older, it can be harder to sweep and vacuum in your home. It’s nice to have a cute little robot scurrying around and cleaning up crumbs off the floor!

If you’re going with a Roomba for Granny this year make sure you pick one that is a contrasting color with her floor. For example if Granny has cream colored carpet, pick a black Roomba! That will help Granny see the Roomba and prevent her from tripping on it.

Also, the internet did not fail me when I researched different ways to decorate Roombas. I saw decal stickers in every color and Roomba costumes. My point is this: you can make Granny’s Roomba stand out while it works to keep her floor clean as a whistle.

Another idea is to copy off Tom from “Parks and Recreation” and mount an MP3 player to the top of Granny’s Roomba. This is like a double bonus because the Roomba is cleaning the house and entertaining your grandma with musical classics from her youth! Genius!

2) Traction cleats

Working Person’s Store

Working Person’s Store

Okay, this is a no brainer. It’s snowed in Kansas City like 500 times already this year. Granny needs some traction cleats to put on her shoes so she doesn’t slip outside!

Granny has a life, you know! She needs to get groceries, see the doctor, and show Dorothy who’s boss at Canasta. Don’t let the snow slow Granny down. Get her some traction cleats so she can make snow and ice her b****!

3) Mini Flashlights

Zoro

Zoro

For the past month or so, I’ve looked at my clock in the evening and thought, “Surely, it must be 10:30.” Then I come to find out it’s actually 6:45 PM!

It’s dark out early in the evening. And Granny wants to go to your kid’s school holiday performance and hear Messiah at the local community center. Granny needs more light when she is moving in and out of cars and buildings. She needs to clearly see every curb and uneven paving in the parking lot so she doesn’t fall!

Get her a mini flashlight to stow in her purse or coat pocket for her to take on the run! Granny will appreciate you helping her see the light! (High fives self for the pun.)

4) Magnetic Door Stop

Do you know what’s super annoying? Holding the door open while you’re trying to get in and out of the house with your arms full of stuff!

Amazon

Amazon

A magnetic door stop could make life a lot easier for Granny, especially if her balance is not as good as it used to be! Guess who’s not falling through the door (thanks to you!)? Granny’s not falling!

While you’re at it, grab a magnetic door stop for yourself!

5) Bidet Toilet Seat

Amazon

Amazon

It’s time for you to become Granny’s favorite family member. Behold! The bidet toilet seat!

This gem will transform Granny’s toilet time! A bidet toilet seat with an adjustable, self cleaning water hose and remote will help Granny feel fresh and so clean even more so than traditional toilet paper can. The adjustable water hose makes it easy for men, women, and children to accurately clean those tricky places. Some models even come with dryers that gently clean your bottom!

Why a remote and not a control panel that’s fixed on the side? Great question! The remote will make it easier for Granny to reach and use compared to a fixed control panel. The control panels are usually placed on the right side. That’s difficult for a left handed user or somebody with a shoulder that can’t reach to the side or back as far as they used to!

If there is no electrical outlet by the toilet, not a problem! There are non-electric options out there as well. Anything to help Granny stay independent with going to the bathroom!

Word of warning: little kids love playing with bidet toilet seats and may need supervision!

Ultimately though, the whole family might want to stop by and use Granny’s throne to try it out. You may feel hesitant right now. But once you try it, you’ll want to install one in your bathroom!

I hope this holiday gift guide will help you find the best gift for your Granny or Grandpa! If you already purchased something, tell us in the comments below! Would you consider buying any of the stuff listed above for your parent or grandparent? Would you buy it for yourself? Need more gift ideas? Contact us to help your parent or grandparent live at home for a lifetime!

Am I Really A Caregiver?

Foreword: I originally published this article in July and thought that it needed another go round on the blog. If you help out a family member, read below and see if you qualify as a caregiver. (More than likely, you probably do!) I want you to know that there are resources available to help you!

Recently, a therapist friend of mine brought up the fact that caregivers do not realize they are caregivers. My mind was blown! She was totally right. It reminded me how I used to not see myself as a caregiver to my grandparents. On a professional level, I have worked with family members in nursing homes who did not see themselves as caregivers. Lots of people do not perceive themselves as caregivers!

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Pexels

It seems like when people think about caregiving they imagine a kind nurse helping a sick, frail patient with some sort of self care task, like getting dressed or taking medicine. Or people think that a caregiver is a parent raising a child. Both thoughts about caregivers are correct, but let me tell you, the definition of a caregiver expands way past physically helping a person with the intimate parts of everyday life.

I talk about caregivers all the time in my blog, videos, and with clients and their families. It is long overdue for me to break down what a caregiver actually does!

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Pexels

A caregiver is a family member, friend, or paid professional that helps a person with activities of daily living. I understand that is a broad definition, but let me explain. Activities of daily living refer not only to self care tasks like toileting, bathing, grooming, etc., but they also refer to taking care of the home, finances, transportation, community errands, using a telephone, and so on and so on.

If you just sit for a minute and actually think about all of the seemingly small things you do a day, than you will realize that some people need help with all of those things you take for granted. Let me tell you about my first hour of a normal day. I get out of bed, put on my glasses, make the bed, go to the bathroom, brush my teeth, let the dog out, make breakfast, eat breakfast, and walk the dog. For each one of those tasks, I could go into even more detail about what I do.

There are some people who need help with every single one of those things that I do in the first hour of the day! My first hour of the day consists of my personal needs and taking care of my dog. If someone helped me with any of those things, they would be my caregiver. Is your mind blown yet?

My personal experience as a caregiver started many years ago with my wonderful grandparents. My grandmother, Granny, would ask me to help out with tasks around the house like changing the light bulbs, taking down the attic fan cover, and carrying the laundry basket up from the basement for her. (By the way, all of those things are caregiving activities!) I did not see myself as a caregiver. I saw myself as helping Granny out! I actually cherished going to my grandparent’s house and reading my list of to do’s. In my mind, that’s what you do for your family: you help your family whenever they need something.

Over time, my grandparents asked for more help around the house and going out in the community. I loved our new weekly ritual of picking them up and driving to the grocery store. Granny would chit chat with the store employees at the front of the store and at checkout. We would take our time walking the aisles while Granny asked me to reach for the products she wanted. I would push the cart and Grandpa helped me load and unload the groceries into the car and house. All of us worked at a furious pace to put the groceries away, “Hurry! The ice cream will melt!”  We ended our grocery run at the dining room table eating donuts and drinking coffee or cappuccino and catching up with each other over the past week. I had no idea that my role as a caregiver would continue to grow.

Eventually, my caregiving responsibilities included managing my grandparent’s medication and finances. I used to work as a pharmacy technician while in school, so it seemed a natural fit for me to make sure their medications were refilled and placed in their weekly medication organizer. Granny trusted me with balancing her checkbook every week and Grandpa knew I would pay the bills as soon as they came in the mail. I always made sure to do the bills and medication how they wanted to give them peace of mind.

The increase in caregiving tasks came with more time spent with my grandparents at their house. My mother and I split caregiving duties to even the load and allow us to attend to other parts of our lives, like work and school. Mom would take my grandparents to doctor’s appointments, the nail salon, the hair salon, and other errands. My grandparents were lucky enough to qualify for a personal care attendant through one of the county’s senior services programs who helped with laundry, cooking, and cleaning the house. We were fortunate to have a team of caregivers for Granny and Grandpa!

Towards the end of Granny’s life, she was able to do many of her self care tasks such as dressing, toileting, bathing, brushing teeth. Sometimes Mom helped Granny put her curlers in her hair in the evening before bed due to Granny’s arthritis in her shoulders. Granny called us when she felt sick and we would give her medicine and contact her doctor. When she passed suddenly in 2016, I felt my world shift. Of course, I missed my role as a granddaughter to Granny, but I also missed my role as a caregiver to her. I loved how Granny was my caregiver when I was a child, and I was able to be a caregiver to her in the last part of her life.

In a way, my role as a caregiver to Grandpa has greatly reduced as well. After Granny passed, Grandpa needed physical help with self care tasks in addition to taking care of the house. Grandpa now requires at least two people to help with sitting and standing during his activities of daily living 24 hours a day. Because of Grandpa’s needs for more help, he now lives in a long term care facility where the nursing staff provides the care he needs. Now, my role is back to being his granddaughter. We still continue our tradition of cappuccino and donuts every Sunday while we visit together.

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Pexels

I hope my personal experience as a caregiver allows you to see your role as a caregiver to others. Do you take out your neighbor’s trash? Do you mow your uncle’s lawn? Do you show your grandma how to take a selfie or post on Facebook? Do you take down your mom’s curtains to be washed? Guess what? You’re a caregiver.

As a fellow caregiver, I salute you. Caregiving is an unpaid, invisible, incredibly important job that almost all of us do and are not recognized. Caregiving is one of the hardest experiences we encounter as human beings. It demands patience and dedication to our loved ones or people we provide services to. I would like to end this article giving you a few resources because I want to make your life easier, friend!

Here are a couple of short videos to brighten your day and show you some caregiving tips: 3 Free Tips for Millennial Caregivers, How to Install a Motion Sensor Light.

Click on these links to learn how to help yourself as a caregiver: Alzheimer's Association, AARP, Caregiver Action Network, and National Alliance for Caregiving

Thank you for taking time out of your busy day! Time is precious when you help a loved one! Please comment down below with any caregiving tips you would like to share!