Stay at Home Solutions
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Stay at Home Solutions blogs on topics such as aging in place, universal design, adaptive equipment, home modifications, accessibility, durable medical equipment, legislation, and caregiving.

Posts in caregiving
Ways to Set Yourself Up to Age Where You Are

Foreword:

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We the people of Stay at Home Solutions fully believe that you should remain in your home and community as long as you like no matter the circumstances. Although we focus on home modifications, or making changes in the home, we understand that there are many components to helping people make changes for aging in place. Our lovely guest author, Hazel Bridges, shares a common mission with us.

Hazel Bridges is the creator of AgingWellness.org, a website that aims to provide health and wellness resources for aging seniors. She’s a breast cancer survivor and challenges herself and others to live life to the fullest.

Settling down in Florida isn’t as popular as it seems. In fact, almost nine out of 10 people over the age of 65 want to enjoy their retirement at home. Are you among them? If so, you likely have numerous reasons for staying put. You’ve been there for years, put down roots, and gotten so used to the locale that anywhere else would just seem foreign. Plus, you likely have plenty of relatives and friends nearby, and it would be too hard to bid them all farewell. Nonetheless, aging in place is more than just carrying on as you are. you need to adapt your home to the changes ahead so you’ll stay secure and comfortable well into your golden years.

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Establish a Budget

The renovations you make will likely run into the thousands of dollars, so it’s good to have a plan in place for how you’re going to pay for them, along with an upper limit so you don’t go over your budget. You may want to consider a home equity loan or reverse mortgage, both of which are popular means of financing an extensive remodeling. (For specific financial resources in Kansas and Missouri, CLICK HERE!)

Perform a Safety Check

Modifications should address whatever dangers are present in your home. Many of those are the same regardless of the age of the residents, such as a clogged chimney or faulty water heaters, so make sure those are addressed, as well as the ones that are related to your health condition in the future. You may need to call in the help of a professional.

Make a Plan

Having scoured the house for potential dangers and sources of discomfort, make a list of all the renovations you need to make, with the most important on top. You’ll need to interview potential contractors and apply for permits if you’re making any serious structural changes to the home. All of that takes time, so make room in your schedule for it.

Improve Mobility

This should be a major focus, as getting up and down stairs will be more difficult in the years ahead. A ramp at the entrance way would solve that problem nicely, though they generally run between $3,500 and $8,000 according to Networx. Doorways in the interior can be made more accommodating for much cheaper with the installation of expandable hinges.

Prevent Falls

Taking steps to prevent falls is equally as important as improving mobility, if not more. Focus on the kitchen and bathroom, both of which can be particularly hazardous largely due to moisture. Slip-free flooring would be ideal for both areas, whereas safety modifications such as grab bars, walk-in shower, and shower chairs make keeping clean a much less risky endeavor.

Enhance Overall Comfort

With your safety addressed, you can have a little fun, as your retirement is supposed to be enjoyable. Be creative. Awesome Inventions does precisely that in proposing doors that double as bookshelves or a shower area for you dog. While you’re at it, you could transform an entire room into a library or hobby space for paining, reading, and writing.

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Find Some Help

You may not need it now, but there are numerous professionals offering custodial care in your city. For a small fee, caregivers help out with whatever chores need doing around the house, as well as things such as bathing, dressing, and meal preparation. Familiarize yourself with the costs, as you never know when you’ll need the services.

Once you’ve taken these measures, there’s nothing to stop you from enjoying your retirement in safety without picking up your roots and moving. And that makes it a wonderful time to be alive.

Afterword:

Thank you, Hazel, for bringing up great points for people to consider! Money is one of the biggest barriers to home modifications, or making changes in the home. People balk at the price of remodeling for good reason! It’s pricey!

It’s important to look at home modifications as an investment for your health and safety throughout life. If you’re a Kansas or Missouri resident, click here to look at financial resources for our area. Be aware that home modifications do not always mean changing the structure of the environment, like ripping out a step in shower and putting in a barrier free shower.

Home modifications can also be home repairs, purchasing household items (i.e. a night lamp to see the pathway to the bathroom), and adaptive equipment, like a reacher or grabber. The big takeaway is you need an occupational therapist to help you decide what’s going to work the best for you. Occupational therapists save you money! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen time and money wasted on home modifications because there wasn’t an occupational therapist involved! I’ve seen grab bars put in the wrong spot for the person using it, slippery flooring, all white bathrooms (bad for people with low vision), etc., etc., etc.!

When considering making changes at home, call me to help you navigate the best option for you. I’m happy to work with the contractor of your choosing to customize your house to your needs. My favorite part about my job is helping people fulfill their ultimate wish: the ability to remain in the comfort of their own home.

Hooray for planning for a safe and independent future at home! Today’s the day! You better do it before you need it!

New Year Resolution 2019 for Your Home
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Happy New Year, my friends! Here at Stay at Home Solutions, we really enjoyed celebrating the holidays, but we’re even happier to get back on track with our purpose to serve the Kansas City area and beyond.

Our mission is to help people figure out what changes they need to live at home safely and independently as long as they choose.

What do I mean by making changes in the home? They could be as simple as putting an automatic sensor night light next to the bed or placing the most used dishes closer to your reach. Some changes in the home may be more extensive like installing a barrier free shower or making one entryway stepless.

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Believe it or not, many people don’t have the choice of living in their own home.

Falls and injuries in the home are often the culprit to why someone needs to move out of their private abode.

Unfortunately, I’ve seen a lot of well meaning friends and family members make the unwanted decision to move their loved one into a senior living community or a nursing home. It’s hard for every party involved in this situation. No one wants to have their loved one move into an institution.

Let me help you prevent this scenario in your life! There are many preventable actions you can take today to avoid having someone else decide when you move out of your house. Make it your resolve to call us to help you navigate what actions to take!

I’ll tell you what actions Esther took to help her live in her home safely. When I saw Esther, she explained that she barely took showers because she was scared to death of falling while getting in and out of her shower.

I didn’t blame Esther at all. Looking at the shower I wondered how she managed to get in at all! The shower required her to step up eight inches and had a small, slippery built in seat.

Now, I know that doesn’t seem like a big deal to you if you’ve never had problems moving around. But it’s a BIG deal to a lot of older adults.

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During my evaluation, I noticed Esther was weak and needed quite a bit of help from her caregiver to get in and out of the shower. The chronic pain in her back and legs made it more difficult to shower without falling at a moment’s notice.

Esther lives in a senior living community. The director of the community explained that the shower Esther had was newly installed. It was their version of a “walk in shower”. Naturally if Esther wanted a new shower, she could pay for it out of pocket.

Sidenote: Why don’t these communities consult with occupational therapists? We can help them save so much time and money by not installing these step up showers!

Not to my surprise, Esther was not interested in installing a barrier free shower with money from her own pocket. “What am I going to do? Not shower at all?”

During my assessment, I measured the dimensions of the shower and noted that a shower chair with a backrest and armrests could easily fit inside. The shower chair would provide firm seating for Esther instead of the slippery built in seat. I recommended she install a couple of grab bars: one outside the shower and one inside next to the shower chair.

Sadly, the bathroom did not allow enough space for us to make changes to the step up inside the shower. Esther said she would just deal with it, “Maybe it will strengthen my legs.”

Esther already had a long handled shower head to aim water wherever she needed while sitting down. Sitting down while showering saves energy and prevents falls. It also gives caregivers peace of mind to not worry about catching a slippery body!

When the contractor came to install the grab bars, I worked with him on the best placement based off of Esther’s height and reach.

I love customizing changes at home to the client’s exact needs!

Once the project was completed and everything was installed, Esther took her first shower. She gushed about it over the phone to me, “I love it so much! I feel much safer!”

On my next visit to Esther’s home, she was late to answer the door. I felt concerned at first thinking Esther had an accident and was injured. Much to my relief, Esther came to the door and told me, “I felt so good taking a shower this morning that I asked my caregiver to let me sit in there longer.”

I can’t describe how amazing it feels to help someone feel safer doing what so many of us take for granted. Every day, we bebop along getting dressed in the morning, making coffee, driving to work, vacuuming, etc. We don’t think about what it might look like when we get older or if we were to have an injury.

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Now, Esther takes more showers during the week because she feels safe and comfortable. Her caregiver doesn’t worry about her falling as much while getting in and out of the shower. My work helped two people and gave peace of mind to Esther’s sons.

This anecdote is just a small slice of what I do for people in my community. It’s amazing to tell people what I do for a living: I empower people to live in their home safely. This is my purpose on this planet.

I’m challenging you to make a resolution at the top of 2019 right now. Your resolution is to take one action step towards helping you live at home for a lifetime. That action step could be many things: call me, look at my blog for ideas, watch my videos, or learn about financial resources for home modifications by clicking HERE.

Just learning about your options for making changes at home can be tremendously helpful in the future when you need it. Why wait? Do it before you need it!

Am I Really A Caregiver?

Foreword: I originally published this article in July and thought that it needed another go round on the blog. If you help out a family member, read below and see if you qualify as a caregiver. (More than likely, you probably do!) I want you to know that there are resources available to help you!

Recently, a therapist friend of mine brought up the fact that caregivers do not realize they are caregivers. My mind was blown! She was totally right. It reminded me how I used to not see myself as a caregiver to my grandparents. On a professional level, I have worked with family members in nursing homes who did not see themselves as caregivers. Lots of people do not perceive themselves as caregivers!

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It seems like when people think about caregiving they imagine a kind nurse helping a sick, frail patient with some sort of self care task, like getting dressed or taking medicine. Or people think that a caregiver is a parent raising a child. Both thoughts about caregivers are correct, but let me tell you, the definition of a caregiver expands way past physically helping a person with the intimate parts of everyday life.

I talk about caregivers all the time in my blog, videos, and with clients and their families. It is long overdue for me to break down what a caregiver actually does!

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A caregiver is a family member, friend, or paid professional that helps a person with activities of daily living. I understand that is a broad definition, but let me explain. Activities of daily living refer not only to self care tasks like toileting, bathing, grooming, etc., but they also refer to taking care of the home, finances, transportation, community errands, using a telephone, and so on and so on.

If you just sit for a minute and actually think about all of the seemingly small things you do a day, than you will realize that some people need help with all of those things you take for granted. Let me tell you about my first hour of a normal day. I get out of bed, put on my glasses, make the bed, go to the bathroom, brush my teeth, let the dog out, make breakfast, eat breakfast, and walk the dog. For each one of those tasks, I could go into even more detail about what I do.

There are some people who need help with every single one of those things that I do in the first hour of the day! My first hour of the day consists of my personal needs and taking care of my dog. If someone helped me with any of those things, they would be my caregiver. Is your mind blown yet?

My personal experience as a caregiver started many years ago with my wonderful grandparents. My grandmother, Granny, would ask me to help out with tasks around the house like changing the light bulbs, taking down the attic fan cover, and carrying the laundry basket up from the basement for her. (By the way, all of those things are caregiving activities!) I did not see myself as a caregiver. I saw myself as helping Granny out! I actually cherished going to my grandparent’s house and reading my list of to do’s. In my mind, that’s what you do for your family: you help your family whenever they need something.

Over time, my grandparents asked for more help around the house and going out in the community. I loved our new weekly ritual of picking them up and driving to the grocery store. Granny would chit chat with the store employees at the front of the store and at checkout. We would take our time walking the aisles while Granny asked me to reach for the products she wanted. I would push the cart and Grandpa helped me load and unload the groceries into the car and house. All of us worked at a furious pace to put the groceries away, “Hurry! The ice cream will melt!”  We ended our grocery run at the dining room table eating donuts and drinking coffee or cappuccino and catching up with each other over the past week. I had no idea that my role as a caregiver would continue to grow.

Eventually, my caregiving responsibilities included managing my grandparent’s medication and finances. I used to work as a pharmacy technician while in school, so it seemed a natural fit for me to make sure their medications were refilled and placed in their weekly medication organizer. Granny trusted me with balancing her checkbook every week and Grandpa knew I would pay the bills as soon as they came in the mail. I always made sure to do the bills and medication how they wanted to give them peace of mind.

The increase in caregiving tasks came with more time spent with my grandparents at their house. My mother and I split caregiving duties to even the load and allow us to attend to other parts of our lives, like work and school. Mom would take my grandparents to doctor’s appointments, the nail salon, the hair salon, and other errands. My grandparents were lucky enough to qualify for a personal care attendant through one of the county’s senior services programs who helped with laundry, cooking, and cleaning the house. We were fortunate to have a team of caregivers for Granny and Grandpa!

Towards the end of Granny’s life, she was able to do many of her self care tasks such as dressing, toileting, bathing, brushing teeth. Sometimes Mom helped Granny put her curlers in her hair in the evening before bed due to Granny’s arthritis in her shoulders. Granny called us when she felt sick and we would give her medicine and contact her doctor. When she passed suddenly in 2016, I felt my world shift. Of course, I missed my role as a granddaughter to Granny, but I also missed my role as a caregiver to her. I loved how Granny was my caregiver when I was a child, and I was able to be a caregiver to her in the last part of her life.

In a way, my role as a caregiver to Grandpa has greatly reduced as well. After Granny passed, Grandpa needed physical help with self care tasks in addition to taking care of the house. Grandpa now requires at least two people to help with sitting and standing during his activities of daily living 24 hours a day. Because of Grandpa’s needs for more help, he now lives in a long term care facility where the nursing staff provides the care he needs. Now, my role is back to being his granddaughter. We still continue our tradition of cappuccino and donuts every Sunday while we visit together.

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I hope my personal experience as a caregiver allows you to see your role as a caregiver to others. Do you take out your neighbor’s trash? Do you mow your uncle’s lawn? Do you show your grandma how to take a selfie or post on Facebook? Do you take down your mom’s curtains to be washed? Guess what? You’re a caregiver.

As a fellow caregiver, I salute you. Caregiving is an unpaid, invisible, incredibly important job that almost all of us do and are not recognized. Caregiving is one of the hardest experiences we encounter as human beings. It demands patience and dedication to our loved ones or people we provide services to. I would like to end this article giving you a few resources because I want to make your life easier, friend!

Here are a couple of short videos to brighten your day and show you some caregiving tips: 3 Free Tips for Millennial Caregivers, How to Install a Motion Sensor Light.

Click on these links to learn how to help yourself as a caregiver: Alzheimer's Association, AARP, Caregiver Action Network, and National Alliance for Caregiving

Thank you for taking time out of your busy day! Time is precious when you help a loved one! Please comment down below with any caregiving tips you would like to share!

Hate to Admit It, But. . .

I accidentally locked myself out of my own website! So while I was missing last week, here is something I wanted to share:

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Seniors Flourish graciously posted an article I wrote about how occupational therapists can help caregivers and patients make changes in the home to keep patients safe and independent during daily activities! Click here to read it! You don’t have to be an occupational therapist to benefit from it!

Also, feel free to peruse the rest of the Seniors Flourish website! It has excellent resources on how occupational therapists can provide evidence-based interventions to help their clients. You never know, you could learn a thing or two!

Stay tuned to check out the blog post this Tuesday at noon! I’ll give you a hint: it has to do with finances!

Can You Relate?
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Breaking a bone in your body is one of the worst experiences you can have in your lifetime. Trust me. I know this experience firsthand!

When I was eight-years-old, I climbed the wobbly, rickety chain link fence in the backyard at home and toppled over to fall to the ground breaking my left elbow. I remember passing out from the pain after seeing my mother’s scared facial expression.

At the hospital, I was given pain medication that completely knocked me out. The radiology tech had to keep prodding me to stay awake while taking x-rays of my arm. Eventually, I had surgery to realign my bones with two pins.

I remember the whole experience vividly! I was small and nimble enough to not need any home modifications. BUT I needed help with getting dressed, going to the bathroom, taking a shower, and brushing my hair. The pain from my arm would wake me up sometimes at night. I had to sleep lying on my back with my arm propped up on pillows.

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I HATE sleeping on my back!

Luckily, I am right handed and had all the benefits of youth while waiting for my arm to heal! I was able to easily manipulate brushing my teeth, drawing, feeding, playing card games, and anything else you can think of with my right hand. Recovery took no time at all for me as a child. As soon as I was able to use my left arm, I quickly returned to dance lessons and playing piano.

I could never forget how my injury impacted my life in such a profound way. My mother was wary and extra protective while my arm healed. She made sure my sisters and cousins were careful when they played around me. Mom did not want me to be hurt again!

Looking back, I not only see the physical impacts a broken arm had on my life. I also see how I changed the way I took care of myself and how my family members and friends treated me.

As an eight-year-old, I was very independent in taking care of myself prior to the injury, especially as the oldest of four children. When I broke my arm, it felt like going in reverse needing even more help from my mother. She even tied my shoes again. I saw myself as an independent person changing into an interdependent person.

That’s hard even for an eight-year-old child.

I can’t tell you how happy and relieved I was to resume my independence again after my arm fully recovered. But not everyone can experience this type of relief.

As an adult, injuries like broken bones can be more damaging and long lasting than what children experience. This is where it gets deep, people!

Adults have decades of being independent in taking care of themselves and others. A broken bone drastically changes how they view themselves. Accepting help can sometimes be seen in the same vein as becoming older or aging.

Of course, as occupational therapists, it’s easy for us to reassure adults with injuries that they are not old people (there’s nothing wrong with that anyway!). We educate them on all of the ways they can still do what they need and want to do. However, we do need to remind ourselves that when people break a bone, they are grieving the loss (temporary or permanent) of their independence and the way they used to do daily activities. Even little eight-year-old me grieved over not being able to play tag and ride my bike for a couple of months.

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Whoa. Grief? Yes. Here’s an example!

Dave broke his tibia stepping off a sidewalk into the street while heading to a coffee shop. He had surgery and needed to use a walker to help balance while hopping on one leg to get around. He quickly realized he needed a lot of help with getting in and out of his house, bed, shower, and going up and down the stairs. Dave was frustrated he could not move easily around his house anymore.

Pistola squat by Workoutlabs.com

Pistola squat by Workoutlabs.com

He thought, “Dang, I never thought I would need to do a pistola squat to get on and off the toilet! I don’t want my wife to help me with this every day!”

Dave even needed help picking up his dog’s bowls to put water and food in them! He felt like he had to rely on his wife to do everything. Dave started to feel depressed while his leg was healing because he wanted to do more by himself. Dave loved his wife, but he didn’t want to be soooo intimate with her while toileting and bathing.

He missed his ability to move around and take care of himself on his own time. Dave wondered if he will be able to continue living in his current house as it was. “What if I could never walk again? What will I do?”

In this situation, it’s easy to see why Dave would grieve the loss of his privacy, caring for himself, and moving around. He feels frustrated on how much effort he has to put in to simply move around the house. These emotions are very normal for any person. Have you every had this type of experience? Can you relate to Dave?

There are some things we cannot control whatsoever, like accidents. But we certainly can control our environment! Since we know breaking bones is such a challenging physical and emotional time, I am happy to say there are ways we can prevent lessen some of the pain and maintain our dignity by making changes in the home.

Yes, as a kid, I easily navigated my environment with a broken arm. However, poor adult Dave struggled to move around in and outside of his house with a broken leg. Let me tell you three things he could do to his house to make recovery better:

Stanton Homes

Stanton Homes

1) Create one entrance at home with ZERO steps. This will make it easier to use a walker to hop on one leg in and out of the house. Dave will be able to escape the home in case of emergency, see the doctor, go to outpatient therapy, spend time with friends at the ball game, etc. Dave can just enjoy not struggling to get in and out of his own house! He will not feel like a trapped prisoner!

Barrier free shower by Accessible Solutions

Barrier free shower by Accessible Solutions

2) Build a bathroom on the main floor of the house. Preferably this will be a full bathroom, but a half bathroom will certainly suffice! Put blocking in the walls in order to install grab bars later if needed. The blocking will allow you to install grab bars at any height! How neat! Grab bars could help Dave get on and off the toilet by himself, but there are a lot more options I can talk about with Dave and his wife.

3) Install a barrier free shower. Dave can easily use this shower with or without a broken leg! A barrier free shower lets you walk in and out without stepping over anything! This type of shower is perfect for all ages and abilities from wheelchair users to people who walk on two legs. Learn more by clicking here or here!

If you can relate to Dave, you may want to consider planning on making changes to your current home. Life is unpredictable, but if you do it before you need it then you are setting yourself up to maintain your independence and dignity in your own home. Please comment below if you or someone you know has had Dave’s experience of grieving the loss of taking care of yourself.

Midwest Ability Summit Experience and EXCITING Announcement!
Photo: Amanda Pearman

Photo: Amanda Pearman

(FYI: This post is an overview about my experience at the Midwest Ability Summit this last Saturday. BUT if you want to skip down to the bottom to read my exciting announcement, I wouldn’t blame you!)

Oh my! This past Saturday was fantastic! I had a booth at the Midwest Ability Summit at the Overland Park Convention Center in Overland Park, KS. This event is an ability expo that showcases various resources in the Kansas City metro for people with disabilities, their family members, caregivers, and health care professionals. There were educational classes, non-profit organizations, service providers, and tons more from law groups to home health companies!

Check out midwestabilitysummit.org to see all of the exhibitors from this year! Also, click here to learn more about the purpose of Stay at Home Solutions!

Personally, I felt so happy for my booth to sit right next to the KSDS Assistance Dogs because I got to sneak over and pet the doggies in training! For you animal lovers, there were also adorable therapy mini ponies at the summit. Never discount the health benefits of our four-legged friends!

Photo: David Groves

Photo: David Groves

There were many other sights to take in at this event. I enjoyed watching the tennis demonstration area directly across from my booth. The happy expressions on the children and adults lobbying tennis balls to each other felt palpable! In fact, I tossed a couple of stray balls back into action. In addition to a sports viewing, I saw children and adults test recumbent bikes and power wheelchairs and standing frames around the convention center floor with huge grins. Everybody was having fun!

To add to the festivities, my booth offered candy amid other freebies like pens, sticky pads, and chapstick. I heard many parents bemoan the fact that the summit was like Halloween because of the vast amounts of candy within reach for the children! My booth neighbors came and grabbed candy for a quick snack every once in a while in between people. Visitors hauled tote bags full of goodies and information around the venue while talking to exhibitors.

The summit impressed me with the consideration of their guests! For instance, they provided a quiet/ sensory friendly area for people who needed a break from the stimulating sights and sounds. The displays were fantastic too! My friend and frequent project collaborator, David Groves of Accessible RehabWorks, set up a barrier free shower, patio, and wooden ramp. It looked amazing and added to the atmosphere of this event.

I was also delighted to see organizations represented at the summit that contribute excellent services to the community and I deeply support, like Minds Matter!

I felt so pleased to have many people come visit at my booth! I was happy to answer questions about my business and home modifications. Here are some of the most frequent ones:

Question: “How far out do you visit people?”

Answer: I see everyone in the Kansas City area in about a 50 mile radius. I am willing to Skype or do some other type of video communication with people who live outside of the area. For people who live outside Kansas City, I offered to help find home modification occupational therapists for people, like in Texas and Colorado.

Question: “Do you read blueprints?”

Answer: Yes, I do! I am happy to consult for people planning on building houses in order for them to live safely and independently.

Question: “I live in an apartment/townhouse. Can you help me?”

Answer: Absolutely yes! The Fair Housing Act ensures landlords allow reasonable accommodations be made for their residents. I recommend home modifications that will benefit you and make your landlord happy.

Question: “Do you see people of all ages?”

Answer: Yes, I am happy to see everybody! Everyone deserves to live in their home safely and independently without worry of moving to a facility!

Photo: Amanda Pearman

Photo: Amanda Pearman

Question: “Do you take insurance?”

Answer: I take Missouri Medicare and am able to bill all of the managed care insurance companies for Medicare beneficiaries like Blue Cross Blue Shield, Aetna, Coventry, etc.

Question: “Are you an occupational therapist?”

Answer: Why yes I am!

There were visitors who asked specific questions about their home. For example, I helped a lady problem solve how to prevent water from spreading all over her bathroom floor from her barrier free shower. Another couple discussed options for downsizing their current home to make sure they could age in place in the community as opposed to going to a facility. I thoroughly enjoyed talking to people and learning about their needs and concerns for staying at home.

Photo: Pexels

Photo: Pexels

Hear ye! Hear ye! Okay, now are you ready for my EXCITING announcement!

I have a RAFFLE for a FREE home evaluation! This is for all ages! If you win, I will come to your home and give you options on what you can do to live safely and independently! There are no prerequisites for a home evaluation (like a history of falls or disability). Every single person on the planet benefits from a professional like me to come give you ideas!

How do you enter? Like my Facebook page (@stayathomesolutionskc) by August 30th at 9 PM to enter the raffle! If you have already liked my Facebook page, please follow me on Instagram (@stayathomesolutions) or Pinterest (Stay at Home Solutions) to enter the raffle! Remember, I also post videos on YouTube at Stay at Home Solutions.

If you win the free home evaluation and you would like to gift it to a friend or family member, you sure can!

The winner will be announced this Friday, August 31st at noon on Facebook! Tune in to see who wins this amazing prize! Contests like these make me feel so excited!

I promise to shoot the Facebook video in landscape this time!

Lastly, I just wanted to say how honored I am to be included in the Midwest Ability Summit. The organizers are lovely, big-hearted people to create a one-stop shop for people of all different conditions and backgrounds. The summit was all inclusive and fun for attendees! I look forward to being a part of this event next year!